Kenneth Howse

James Martin Senior Research Fellow

Director of PCAP Centre

Tel: +44 (0) 1865 612809
E-mail: kenneth.howse@ageing.ox.ac.uk

Research

Kenneth Howse is a Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Institute of Population Ageing, Editor of Ageing Horizons and Director of the PCAP Centre.

Kenneth Howse joined the Institute from the Centre for Policy on Ageing, where for several years he worked on a range of issues, including health policy and the place of religion in later life. His interest in ageing issues began in the late 1980s, when he was a Research Fellow with the Institute of Medical Ethics and worked on rationing problems in health care and the ethics of psychiatric research. This background in applied ethics is reflected in his strong interest in the ethical and normative dimension of the policy implications of demographic ageing. He manages the Health and Longevity research theme, and his current research focus is intergenerational equity and ethical issues surrounding ageing. He is currently working on problems of generational fairness in pension reform and the policy issues that are likely to arise as a result of the increasing prevalence of extreme longevity.

Recent professional committments

Howse was appointed co-ordinator, with Professor Sarah Harper, of the International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU) Oxford research programme on ageing, and was also invited as an expert on longevity for the EU Framework ENHANCE project (longevity, biotechnology and human enhancement).

He is also a key member of The Complex Environmental Population Interactions Project which unites key demographers, economists, anthropologists, philosophers and environmentalists to address through research, modeling and scenarios, the range of complex interactions between environmental and demographic change over the first half of the 21st century.


Recent publications

Articles:

  • Long-term care strategies: the difficulties of taking a global view. Ageing Horizons 2007: 6.
  • Updating the debate on intergenerational fairness. Social Policy & Administration 2007; 40(1):50-64
  • Increasing life expectancy and the compression of morbidity. OIA Working Paper 2006.
  • Projections and predictions: the impact of population ageing on health and health care spending OIA Briefings 2006.
  • Pension reform and age of entitlement rules. Ageing Horizons 2006; 5: pp3-11.
  • Policies for healthy ageing (2005) Ageing horizons; issue no 2: pp3-15.
  • Help avoidance: why older people do not always seek help (2004). Reviews in gerontology; vol 14 (no 1): pp 63-70.
  • What has fairness got to do with it? Social justice and pension reform (2004). Ageing horizons; issue no 1: pp3-14.
  • Religion and spirituality in later life (2004). Generations review; vol 14 (no. 4): pp16-19.

Reports and monographs:

  • Growing old in prison: a scoping study of older prisoners (2003). London: Prison Reform Trust.
  • Community Development and Older People (2003). Beth Johnson Foundation.
  • The Policy Challenges of Population Ageing (2003). Leveson Paper No 5. Leveson Centre for the Study of Ageing, Spirituality and Social Policy.